Review: Love Letters to Fuckbois and Other Woes of Wayward Women

Love Letters to Fuckbois and Other Woes of Wayward Women 7th – 19th May http://anywherefest.com/love-letters Love Letters to Fuckbois and Other Woes of Wayward Women was a frank, hilarious and surprisingly touching expression of two women’s experiences of sexuality, relationships, love and not-love, and everything in between. The show’s premise was simple – two women […]

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Love Letters to Fuckbois and Other Woes of Wayward Women
7th – 19th May
http://anywherefest.com/love-letters

Love Letters to Fuckbois and Other Woes of Wayward Women was a frank, hilarious and surprisingly touching expression of two women’s experiences of sexuality, relationships, love and not-love, and everything in between. The show’s premise was simple – two women talking about their lives. A draw, which for me, was irresistible.

The Lucky Duck café was the perfect setting for such an intimate performance. The set consisted of but two microphones and a jar of letters, all addressed by the performers (Lia Stark and Melina Wightman) to various people in their lives and past lives – mothers, selves, but mostly, as the show might suggest, fuckbois – although they don’t even get through all of them in the half an hour segment dedicated to their disclosure. The show promised honesty and it delivered. Wightman and Stark are clever, hilarious and write a damn good letter, just maybe not one you’d like to be on the receiving end on. Each letter was a narrative in itself and were refreshingly relatable. Dedications to that boy you’ll always have a crush on, the person you regret treating so badly, that person who just rubbed you the right way for all the wrong reasons. People are complicated, relationships are complicated and so we should talk about it and laugh and look at ourselves. This is what Stark and Wightman encourage, asking the audience to leave their own letters, knowing full well that we all have a story.

The actual show was arguably a little lengthy duration. There was a seemingly unnecessary intermission towards the end which seemed fully for the purpose of a costume change. The closing of the work seemed like it could have been done in that first act. However, those closing moments could not have been lost. Watching the performers read their letters to themselves was the most touching moment of the show – what could have come across as corny was actually rather moving. As said before, Stark and Wightman encourage their audience to look at themselves and how they’ve been treated and how they treat others. But rather than being preachy or shameful, its done in a way that’s emotional and funny and warm. Love Letters to Fuckbois was everything it promised and as funny and earnest as expected, but had an element of real depth, emotion and reflection that was slightly unexpected, yet necessary to make the show as strong as it was.

This review was based off the reviewer’s experience of the performance on the 7th of May.